Chikungunya

Chikungunya on the rise, says HPA

  • 790 cases of chikungunya reported thus far this year
  • 1,700 cases of dengue reported thus far this year

Zunana Zalif
zunana

K. Male' 2019 Apr 25 | Thu 16:43 31,860 local

Mosquitoes, the source through which Chikungunya is spread - Google

Maldives Health Protection Agency (HPA) has stated that there has been a recorded rise in chikungunya case throughout the Maldives in recent days.

According to the agency’s statistics, out of the 790 cases of the mosquito-borne disease, most cases were reported from Thaa, Gaaf Alif and Kaafu atolls.

HPA stressed that while the cases on the wide-spreading disease were on the rise from the beginning of the year till March, reported cases of chikungunya show no sign of decreasing.

Past statistics reveal that the last outbreak of chikungunya was in 2006.

Further, HPA went on to reveal that up until 23 April, out of the 1,700 cases recorded, most cases of dengue fever were reported from Alif Alif and Laamu atolls as well as the capital city Malé.

This is significant rise compared to the previous years, HPA stressed.

HPA on Tuesday revealed that there is a possibility of airborne viral diseases to be on the rise again as the weather has cleared after heavy rain showers earlier this week.

HPA via twitter publicized a list of safety measures that may be taken to reduce the risk of catching said diseases. The most important measure was to pay attention to hygiene and eliminate mosquito breeding sites. Highlighting that cleaning initiatives may be taken in outlying islands, HPA urged island councils to use fogging machines and to get actively involved in cleaning junctions as well as dump sites. The people are also urged to wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants, and use mosquito repellent lotion and spray.

Some symptoms of dengue include sudden rise in body temperature, severe headaches, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, vomiting, and mild bleeding while symptoms of chikungunya are similar, including rashes and joint swelling which may be severe in some cases.

Last updated at: 3 months ago | Reviewed by: Aishath Shaany

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